#GivingTuesday

December 2nd, 2014

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New Yorkers are a loving bunch. Let’s show what we are made of today. The top of our list for great NY 501c3s include:

Climate Reality Project

Haiti Cardiac Alliance

Harlem AfterSchool Educational Fund HEAF

Learning Leaders

Lulu and Leo Fund

New York City Coalition Against Hunger

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New York City Coalition Against Hunger, Annual Benefit, May 6 – honoring Chelsea Clinton

April 4th, 2014

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NYCCAH, The New York City Coalition Against Hunger, works to move the 1.5M New Yorkers who choose between a utility bill and a meal, beyond the soup kitchen. Forty percent of this population are children. When schools are closed, and the government provided breakfast, and state provided lunches are not available, many of these children do not eat.

Please support NYCCAH to advocate for policies that feed New Yorkers, until they are able to feed themselves.

Learn more at NYCCAH.org.

 

 

 

Up2US Gala Benefit, NYC, June 4, 2013

May 8th, 2013

44859_479202935485237_1374464084_nUp2Us is having its first ever Gala to celebrate our work as the leading national organization dedicated to ending childhood obesity, reducing youth violence and improving academic performance through the power of sports.

Established in 2009, Up2Us has built a network of more than 600 member organizations serving 25 million youth across the country in just three years! 

Our gala promises to be a spectacular event. We look forward to an evening filled with our friends, donors, coaches, athletes and celebrities, honoring Up2Us’ achievements and future goals. I hope you will join us in making this event a success!

Click this link to learn more and purchase tickets. 

Follow Up2US on Facebook.

Ugo Rondinone’s Human Nature Transforms Rockefeller Center

April 24th, 2013

Screen shot 2013-04-24 at 3.09.44 PMFor seven weeks this spring, Ugo Rondinone’s Human Nature transforms Rockefeller Center Plaza between 49th and 50th Streets. As if transported from another time, the nine colossal stone figures that comprise the work range in height from 16 to 20 feet and weigh up to 30,000 pounds each. Their immovable legs become gates through which visitors may pass, experiencing the rough surfaces of these primal forms.

To share your photos of the exhibition, submit to our User Uploaded Gallery  or tag them #UgoNYC on the web.

Join us on May 8 for Public Art Fund Talks at The New School when Rondinone will present the first public lecture on his work in New York City. For more information and to purchase tickets click here.

On display at Rockefeller Center through June 7, 2013.

Audubon’s Aviary – at the NY Historical Society

April 6th, 2013

To celebrate the sesquicentennial of the New-York Historical Society’s purchase of the Audubon avian watercolors and the the release of the lavishly illustrated book Audubon’s Aviary: The Original Watercolors for “The Birds of America”?published by the New-York Historical Society and Skira/Rizzoli and winner of a 2013 New York Book Show Award—the New-York Historical Society plans a sweeping three-part exhibition to showcase every masterpiece from its unparalleled collection of John James Audubon’s preparatory watercolor models for the sumptuous double-elephant-folio print edition of The Birds of America (1827–38). Over three years Audubon’s Aviary: The Complete Flock (Parts I–III), will feature all 474 stunning avian watercolors by Audubon in the collection, alongside engaging state-of-the-art media installations that will provide a deeper understanding of the connection between art and nature.

New-York Historical Society is located at  170 Central Park West, 77th Street, New York, NY 10024. The society is open Tuesdays through Sundays. For more information,…

Manhattan Users Guide

March 15th, 2013

MUG – Manhattan Users Guide is running a pledge drive. After many year’s of benefit from the choice recommendations, it’s a pleasure to know that user support will ensure the longevity of MUG.

Join us in support of one of NY’s great jewels.

 

Petting Zoo — More good fun from Christoph Niemann, for iphone / ipad

February 22nd, 2013

Petting Zoo, an iphone / ipad app available now at the itunes store for $1.99 from the wonderful illustrator Christoph Niemann, who brought us I LEGO NY and Subway,

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creativity: The Real World – Starting January 9, 2013

January 2nd, 2013

 

Creativity: The Real World — A 12-week meet-and-greet tour of advertising agencies, digital studios, and social media firms brings young professionals front and center with the creative industry?s leaders in New York City.

The Wednesday-evening workshops are led by New York advertising creative leader?Bill Oberlander, whose career has included executive positions at JWT, McCann, Ogilvy,?and Kirshenbaum & Bond, working on such accounts as Bloomberg, Microsoft, Intel,?Nestle, Motorola, Exxon-Mobil, Coca-Cola, Hennessy, Snapple, Dom Perignon, and Target.

Classes meet on-site at each speaker’s office, on Wednesdays, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., January 9 through April 3, 2013. During the first hour, presenters share their most recent creative breakthroughs; the second hour is a review of that week’s creative assignment?-a creative brief delivered by last week?s speaker.

CREATIVITY: THE REAL WORLD — 2013 speakers include Evan Schechtman, CTO, @Radical Media; Anthony Alvarez, ACD, and Jason Ashlock, ACD, R/GA; Mark Mulhern, Senior Vice-President, BBDO; Tina Exarhos, Executive Vice-President, Marketing, MTV; Benjamin Palmer, CEO/CCO, and Jay Zasa, ECD, The Barbarian Group; Joshua Teixeira, Executive Creative Director, and Mark Pollard, Director of Strategy, Big Spaceship; Leo Savage, VP/CD, Grey; Craig Cutler, Photographer/Director, Craig Cutler Productions; Ian Chee, Strategic Planning Director, AKQA; Frank Anselmo, Executive Creative Director, KNARF/NYC; Adrian Barrow, Head of Planning, JWT; and Jon Dupuis, Senior Vice-President and Business Director, Digitas.

 

Tuition is $2,500 for working professionals and $2,000 for 2012 students and recent graduates. More information can be found online at http://realworldcreativity.com/

 

 

Happy Hanukkah from The Jewish Museum

December 10th, 2012

 

 

 

 

Select your menorah, and your background – and enjoy Hannkah with The Jewish Museum on your iphone.

This holiday app is fun, neatly designed, and free at itunes.

Located at 1109 Fifth Avenue at the corner of East 92nd Street in New York City,?The Jewish Museum?is the preeminent museum in the United States devoted to art and Jewish culture, and has the finest, largest and most comprehensive collection of Hanukkah lamps in the world.?The lamps featured in the app come from Austria, Germany, Italy, Poland, Russia, Eastern Europe, Morocco, The Netherlands, Ukraine, Israel, and the United States. Materials range from the traditional copper, silver, and brass to ceramic, silicone, stainless steel, and one using souvenir Statues of Liberty. Hanukkah lamps have often been produced using fantastical designs and shapes. Four major design categories are represented in the Museum’s collection, including Jewish heroes and heroines (like Judith), architectural elements, animals (like the lion), and plants. The lamps incorporate Jewish symbols and secular motifs common in the decorative arts from the Renaissance to the present.

 

The menorah, also called a Hanukkah lamp, is a special object used in the eight-day ceremony of Hanukkah. It holds eight lights – typically candles or small cups of oil – as well as a ninth, the?shamash. The?shamash?is used not only to kindle the lamp, but to provide light so that one does not use the sacred Hanukkah lights for illumination.

 

The joyous nature of the holiday has led over the centuries to a profusion of imaginative lamp shapes and decorations, serious or whimsical: biblical figures, characters from popular culture, buildings, exuberant flowers or exotic animals. Each lamp reflects the interactions between artistic expression, Jewish traditions, historic and geographic influences, and personal experience. Local styles and motifs may be seen in many of the lamps and show the great diversity of places that Jews have settled and flourished.

Happy Hannukah from The Jewish Museum

December 10th, 2012
Lamp: Karim Rashid,?Menorahmorph. The Jewish Museum, NY. Jewish Museum Centennial Commission; Purchase: Tobe Pascher Workshop Commission Program Fund.

Light My Fire: A Hanukkah App?is your gift from The Jewish Museum.

Select you manorah, the background – and light the candles in English, Hebrew or a transliteration.

 

 

Located at 1109 Fifth Avenue at the corner of East 92nd Street in New York City,?The Jewish Museum?is the preeminent museum in the United States devoted to art and Jewish culture, and has the finest, largest and most comprehensive collection of Hanukkah lamps in the world.?The lamps featured in the app come from Austria, Germany, Italy, Poland, Russia, Eastern Europe, Morocco, The Netherlands, Ukraine, Israel, and the United States. Materials range from the traditional copper, silver, and brass to ceramic, silicone, stainless steel, and one using souvenir Statues of Liberty. Hanukkah lamps have often been produced using fantastical designs and shapes. Four major design categories are represented in the Museum’s collection, including Jewish heroes and heroines (like Judith), architectural elements, animals (like the lion), and plants. The lamps incorporate Jewish symbols and secular motifs common in the decorative arts from the Renaissance to the present.

 

The menorah, also called a Hanukkah lamp, is a special object used in the eight-day ceremony of Hanukkah. It holds eight lights – typically candles or small cups of oil – as well as a ninth, the?shamash. The?shamash?is used not only to kindle the lamp, but to provide light so that one does not use the sacred Hanukkah lights for illumination.

 

The joyous nature of the holiday has led over the centuries to a profusion of imaginative lamp shapes and decorations, serious or whimsical: biblical figures, characters from popular culture, buildings, exuberant flowers or exotic animals. Each lamp reflects the interactions between artistic expression, Jewish traditions, historic and geographic influences, and personal experience. Local styles and motifs may be seen in many of the lamps and show the great diversity of places that Jews have settled and flourished.